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patrickschierer:

Lori Tomita Photography.
ideas-about-nothing:

Philips hairdryer concept
sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
William Singer
"Over on a Spot"
Oil and Spraypaint on Paper 39” x 51”
2014
end0skeletal:

(via 500px / Natural colors, colors of nature. by Cat Ti)
pyramidrome:

Victimless Leather: A Prototype of Stitch-less Jacket grown in a Technoscientific ‘Body’

The ‘victimless leather’ is grown from immortalized cell lines which are cultured and form a living layer of tissue supported by a biodegradable polymer matrix in the form of a miniature stitch-less coat-like shape. The victimless leather is grown inside a custom made perfusion chamber. It is an automatic dripping system which drips into the polymers and feeds the cells.   The Victimless Leather project is concerned with growing living tissue into a leather-like material. 

Interestingly, this piece was on view at MoMA and had to be “killed” because it grew out of control. Question… what does it mean to kill an artwork?
READ MORE—>
jreuss:

work
work
work
creatures-alive:

Alaskan Wolf-2 by morphious1803 on Flickr.
bpod-mrc:

16 August 2014
3D-Printed Corpses
Teaching human anatomy to student doctors and budding biomedical scientists requires the dissection of human corpses. The problem is, dead bodies are not always readily available to teaching hospitals. In recent years dissection-based teaching has declined because of the costs and ethical problems involved with acquiring cadavers. There are also concerns about exposure to formaldehyde, a toxic compound used in embalming fluids. Now 3D printing offers an alternative: highly detailed colour models of human body parts based on data from computer tomography scans of real bodies. Researchers have debuted the fabrication technique by printing a polymer hand (pictured) featuring tendons, muscles, arteries, nerves, skin and bone. Such reproductions should be particularly useful in countries where religious beliefs mean bequest programs are banned.
Written by Daniel Cossins
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Image by Paul McMenamin and colleaguesMonash University, Australia Copyright held by original authorsResearch published in Anatomical Sciences Education, June 2014
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theartofsculpture:

Claire Hedden
Oooh, 2011. Earthenware and paint, 16” x 7” x 11”
fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

At the time this film was in production, only four of the eventual seven books in the series had been published. J.K. Rowling was retained as a consultant on the film, not only to ensure consistency with the first book, but also to avoid conflicts with her vision for the later entries.
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001)